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Food

Repulgue

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Yesterday, I learned how to repulgue or crimp an empanada to get that beautiful braided edge. I had trouble doing this the first time when I was following Bon Appetit’s video on making empanadas, but I finally got it when I followed the technique in this other video. The difference is that the second repulgue used a flat surface to help with the crimping.

Categories
Food

Stuck at Home: Easy Recipes

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Sautéed Sardines

Fried sardines with fried rice and fried egg were one of my favorite meals to eat when I was growing up in the Philippines. It’s really easy, and it’s basically the same as this Jamaican recipe. I personally like to eat it with vinegar on the side, but that’s optional.

Ingredients:

  • 1 can sardines in oil
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1 Small onion
  • Black pepper
  • 1 egg
  • Rice

Instructions:

  1. Heat up the oil from the sardine can in the pan
  2. Sauté garlic and onion until caramelized
  3. Add sardines and cook for a little bit
  4. Add pepper to taste. Depending on the sardines, it might already be salty.
  5. Fry the egg and the rice in the residual oil

Mackerel in Coconut Milk

I had some mackerel in my freezer that I didn’t know what to do with, but Andrea found this Filipino recipe online called Ginataang Mackerel. Ginataan means “done in coconut milk.” This was also pretty easy to do, and I like how forgiving it is when you’re missing some of the ingredients. Instead of fish sauce, you can use salt. Instead of chili, you can use cayenne and chili flakes.

Shrimp and Tilapia in Coconut Milk

After I ran out of mackerel, I made a modified version of the ginataan but with shrimp and tilapia. It’s mostly the same recipe, but just make sure to add the shrimp at the very end. You don’t want to over cook it!

Chana Masala with Cauliflower

This is one of my go-to recipes when I’m feeling lazy. I follow this recipe, but I substitute heavy cream with coconut milk. I don’t have naan, so I use flour tortillas as a substitute.

Categories
Food

Stuck at Home: Yogurt

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So I’ve been making yogurt at home again. I figured it’s worth it since I eat quite a bit of yogurt every week, and it isn’t exactly cheap. Target, for example, sells their cheapest yogurt for about $0.09/oz ($2.99 per 32oz container), but it also sells milk for about $0.03/oz ($4.19 a gallon). Since a gallon of milk turns into a gallon of yogurt (unless you strain the liquid out to make greek yogurt), I can have yogurt for just a third of the cost!

The first time I made yogurt was four years ago, and I’m still surprised that all you really need are two things:

  • Milk
  • Plain store-bought yogurt

Of course, there’s the optional fruit or honey or sugar that you can add to it depending on your preferences. The milk can be whole milk, 2% fat, or 0% fat—as long as it’s not lactose-free, you should be fine. You need the lactose because that’s what the bacteria eats. Where do you get the bacteria? You can get that from yogurt that you bought at the store. Make sure it has live and active cultures in it.

There are good resources online that teach you how to make yogurt like Bon Appétit and NYT Cooking, but the gist is:

  1. Heat the milk until it starts to steam. Make sure to heat it slowly and occasionally stir so that you don’t burn the milk.
  2. Let the milk cool down. For me, I just let it sit to cool for around 20 mins or until it’s just warm to the touch. (Wash your hands! I’d use a thermometer, but I unfortunately don’t have one at home.)
  3. Add your store-bought yogurt. Mix thoroughly until it dissolves to distribute the bacteria evenly.
  4. Put it in the oven with just the light on. This should keep it warm enough to encourage the bacteria to grow.
  5. Wait for 12 to 24 hours. The longer it ferments, the thicker and more sour it gets.
  6. Take it out and put it in the fridge. The yogurt will thicken even more as it cools down.

And you’re done! You can use this yogurt to make even more yogurt in the future.